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Down Under

In tightly packed cities, it can be hard to find enough space to grow a garden. In Tokyo, Japan they came up with a clever solution: grow fruits and veggies underground. Using innovative hydroponic growing methods and artificial light, the city-dwellers grow tomatoes, lettuces, strawberries, flowers, and herbs beneath the city streets. There’s even a rice paddy.

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The Air Up There

The Denver Central Library’s garden rooftop improves energy efficiency, cleans the air, manages water run off, and serves as a habitat for local flora and fauna. Advances in technology like Dow’s Protected Membrane Roof System are helping to promote the addition of more green roofs in the world’s most densely populated areas.

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It's Not Easy Being Green

In many cities, pavement takes priority over green space. In the lead up to the 2008 Olympics, Beijing made a great effort to increase green space and tree cover, and the result is now 88 square meters of nature per person—almost double the average of other cities.

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Leave it to the Leaves

The state of Maryland has been aggressively increasing the tree cover for more than 25% of its urban population. In these areas, trees provide storm-water management by catching drops before they even hit the ground. This ultimately improves water, soil, and air quality.

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