Weeks Island Operations employs 82 full-time and contract workers at its location on Weeks Island in Iberia Parish. The site occupies what was once a Morton Chemical facility, and is positioned alongside one of Morton’s salt mines.

Weeks Island employees are proud of their commitments to environment, health, safety and quality. The site is certified to the nationally recognized ISO 9001 quality management system standard.

Morton Salt purchased Weeks Island and its mining and chemical companies in 1947. After closing the chemical businesses in the mid-1980’s, Morton renovated those facilities to house the operations of CVD, Incorporated, which had been acquired by Morton Thiokol in 1987. The site now operates as part of Dow’s Optical and Ceramic Technologies business segment, which is embedded in Dow Electronic Materials.

The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) production process is used in the manufacture of optical materials capable of transmitting infrared wavelengths, which are suitable for use in specialized windows, laser lenses and other optical elements. These materials display superior optical properties and include products CVD ZINC SULFIDE™, CVD ZINC SELENIDE™, CLEARTRAN™, and TUFTRAN™. The CVD process is also used to produce CVD SILICON CARBIDE™, which Dow fabricates into specialized parts with high-wear and high-chemical-resistance properties for semiconductor manufacturing equipment.

Although now considered an industrial complex, Weeks Island was once a thriving community of 1200 people with a post office, library, general store, doctor, and schools. While much has changed on Weeks Island, wildlife is still plentiful. The island is home to many Louisiana Black Bears, white-tailed deer, a variety of birds, and many woodland and swamp creatures such as rabbits, raccoons, skunks, foxes, opossums, beavers, weasels, armadillos, nutria, snakes, and alligators.

Interestingly, Weeks Island is not an” island” by definition - it is one of a string of salt domes that also includes Jefferson, Avery, Cote Blanche, and Belle Isle, collectively known as “The Five Islands.”