Energy Efficiency & Affordable Housing

Building-Houses

Around the world, more than 100 million people are homeless, and 1.6 billion people live in inadequate shelter. An astounding 1.3 billion people have absolutely no access to electricity! We are working on shelter solutions and energy innovations that will help to fill the gaps in the housing and energy area.

Habitat for Humanity

Dow and Habitat recognize that affordable housing is one of the world's most pressing challenges, and together have been building comfortable, affordable homes and changing lives together. A partner since 1983, Dow has supported the construction of more than 45,000 homes – helping families live in decent, affordable housing in 30 countries worldwide including Africa, Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe, as well as North America.

Dow engages a holistic approach with Habitat, contributing not only funds that make building possible and products that deliver reductions in energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but significant volunteer support that is needed to bring projects and the homeowners’ dreams to life.

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Learn more about Dow's partnership with Habitat for Humanity.

DowCorps in Action

Volunteers Work with Habitat in Ethiopia
Ethiopia is the latest country where Dow employees have supported Habitat for Humanity in its effort to improve living conditions in world communities. In September 2015, 15 volunteers from Dow East Africa joined with Habitat, key industry professionals and local partners to build sanitation facilities in Addis Ababa that will serve 60 families, affecting about 300 people.

Dow Helps Turn Houses into Homes
Fifty Dow volunteers from the Elastomers, Electrical and Telecommunications (EE&T) and Dow Automotive businesses joined partner Cooper Standard along with American best-selling author, journalist and radio personality Mitch Albom and his “Working Homes, Working Families” charity to do something incredible for the city of Detroit.

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Over the three-day project, more than 300 volunteers and professional contractors refurbished six abandoned homes.